Auditory Seminar 25 May 2018: Dr. Edmund Lalor, Univ. Rochester

The effects of attention and visual input on noninvasive electrophysiological indices of natural speech processing at different hierarchical levels

Date: 25 May 2018, FRIDAY, 10:00 hr
Location: UMCG, Onderwijscentrum, Lokaal 04

Broadcasting link: https://tinyurl.com/25-05-18-AudSeminar

Dr. Edmund Lalor
University of Rochester

Abstract
How the human brain extracts meaning from the dynamic patterns of sound that constitute speech remains poorly understood. This is especially true in natural environments where the speech signal has to be processed against a complex mixture of background sounds. In this talk I will outline efforts over the last few years to derive noninvasive indices of natural speech processing in the brain. I will discuss how these indices are affected by attention and visual input and how attentional selection and multisensory integration can be “decoded” from EEG data. I will outline work showing that EEG and MEG are sensitive not just to the low-level acoustic properties of speech, but also to higher-level linguistic aspects of this most important of signals. This will include demonstrating that these signals reflect processing at the level of phonetic features. And, based on our most recent work, it will also include evidence that EEG is exquisitely sensitivity to the semantic processing of natural, running speech in a way that is very strongly affected by attention and intelligibility. While showcasing these findings, I will outline a number of paradigms and methodological approaches for eliciting noninvasive indices of speech-specific processing that should be useful in advancing our understanding of receptive speech processing in particular populations.

Combined Auditory/Epigenetics Seminar 5 April 2018: Prof. Marianne Rots,UMCG

Cellular Reprogramming by Epigenetic Engineering

Date: 5 April, Thurs
Time: 13:00 Lecture
Location: 3215.0165
(faculty building ADL1, entrance from Antonius Deusinglaan 1)

We have a combined auditory/epigenetics lecture next week, 5 April, Thursday, given by Prof. Marianne Rots from UMCG. It will be an informal lecture, and anyone who wants to learn more about epigenetics is welcome to join!
Similar to other seminars, audiologists can get credit for participation. Dissimilar to other seminars there will be no broadcasting, and also sign-up required, so please do contact me with a quick yes if you want to join (deadline 28 March)!
If time left a lab tour may follow!

Auditory Seminar 19 January 2018: Dr. Carlos Trenado, University Hospital Düsseldorf, Germany

Corticothalamic feedback dynamics for attention and habituation and its application in tinnitus decompensation

Date: 19 Jan 2018, FRIDAY, 14:00 hr
Location: UMCG, Onderwijscentrum, Lokaal 13

Broadcasting link: https://tinyurl.com/19-01-18-AudSeminar

Dr. Carlos Trenado
Institute of Clinical Neuroscience and Medical Psychology, University Hospital Düsseldorf & Dept. of Psychology and Neurosciences, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University Dortmund, Germany

 

PhD position available: “Why does voice matter for speech perception?”

If you are a master student from a relevant field to our research interests (hearing and speech sciences, psychology, psycholinguistics, neuroscience, biomedical engineering, physics, or other related fields) and have an interest to work in a fun and exciting research group, read on!

We have a PhD position available, specifically on the topic of voice perception and its importance on speech perception. For further details and to send an application, see the link below:
https://euraxess.ec.europa.eu/jobs/248609

6 October 2017: Dr. David Ryugo, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Australia

The Auditory Nerve: Structure, Function, and Plasticity

Date: 6 October 2017, FRIDAY, 14:00 hr
Location: 3215.0165

Broadcasting link: https://tinyurl.com/06-10-2017-Auditory-Seminar

Prof. Dr. David Ryugo
Hearing Research
Garvan Institute of Medical Research
Sydney, Australia

All sound in the environment accesses the brain by way of the auditory nerve. This nerve is primarily composed of neurons with myelinated axons that innervate inner hair cells of the cochlea. In order to make sense of sound, neural activity must be closely linked in time to acoustic events. The auditory system has mechanisms to accomplish this task that will be discussed in this presentation. Each auditory nerve fiber forms a giant terminal in the brain with many synapses, and these terminals, called endbulbs of Held, have been observed in every land vertebrate examined to date. I will explore their specializations in hearing, their pathologic reactions to deafness, and their salvation by cochlear implants.